How to plot your first Facebook Promotion

plotting

In my last post I talked you into it. You have your $7 in your hot little hand and you want to know what it can do for you. Maybe you’re flicking the bills at the screen, only to see them listlessly fall to your desk. It’s okay, that’s normal.

So how do we so this?

At the broadest level, the trick is to marry a noun with a verb. You want a someone to do a something. If you want more “likes” on your page, that is the something. The someone is your target audience. Facebook has lots of targeting options for ads and offers, but no options for promotions. Basically your promotion will target friends and friends-of-friends by giving your post much better news feed ranking than it would have naturally. For our purposes it is just as well, because friends and FoF’s are the most statistically likely to respond anyways.

But what shall we use as bait?

Preparation

In my previous post I said “one simple step”, and if you have already done the prep work then it is as easy as clicking “Promote” on your post and adding your payment information. But if you haven’t done the other things then you need to do a few extra steps. In that case keep reading.

I suggest a one-two punch. Get them to your page, then show them something genuinely exciting on your page. I referred to Game Theory before, and by that I mean the method is to set up several moves in a row. You design each action for your prospect with the next step being obvious.

To get them to your page you could create an ad or promote a post. A post is simpler so lets do that for now. So what do we post? Ask yourself; what gets you to click on a post in your news feed? Usually bait of some kind… something you want or need that resonates with you in the moment. So what do you have that people want or need or makes them feel clever for seeing?

Going with the example of Photographer from my previous post, people want pictures of themselves or family. Good, flattering, fun, brilliant pictures. They want to believe they are smart for choosing you, and that you’ll make them look their best.

An obvious answer would be to post one of your best pictures, but don’t do that without careful thought. Are your pictures better than what other photographers in your circles are posting? Honestly? If not, do you really want to play a losing game?

So what will distinguish you from the twenty-some-odd friends who offer a similar thing? Be off-balance. Stage a crazy photo for your promotion. Maybe a picture of you hanging upside-down on monkey bars to take a picture of a kid also on the monkey bars. Do something fun and outlandish. The point is to capture attention and get them to click. So with your outlandish pic, put in a simple, and I mean dead simple call to action, like “Fall Photo Deals Now”.

So the bait is good. That is what we’re going to spend the $7 on. But before you clicky-clicky, lets make sure they actually want to like your page and (better yet) hire you. So you are going to have another clever picture as your cover photo, something both showing off your skill, and encouraging them to like your page. Then, set as a feature post, you’ll have an image (or video!) about your actual offer. Something that will be the real call to action.

So let’s review. You write a catchy post and promote it for $7. Friends of your friends notice it, because it’s catchy, and Facebook kindly notes that their friend is a fan. Now interested and disarmed they click on it, landing on your business page. The first thing they see is the canvas, and glance at the “Like” button, but don’t click it, because they’re not sure they need to yet.

Then they of course notice your offer. It looks good. And your description says to “like” to see future offers and discounts. Okay then “click”. They liked your page, and they may even message or call you.

Tracking

Digital marketing is the most accountable kind of marketing ever invented. We have the ability to track all kinds of information about how our various efforts perform. However, choosing, tracking, and interpreting that data in a way that truly informs good decisions is not simple at all. That’s why companies hire people like me.

But you can do it yourself, at least well enough to make some progress.

If you’re promoting a page, use Facebook insights to track your effectiveness. If your promoting something outside of Facebook, use a tracking link like bitly.com or a more expansive service such as Google Analytics.

Do it!

If you are promoting a page, go into that page, write your post (be sure to include your catchy image), post, then click “promote”. Add your payment info, and that’s it! If you are promoting something outside of facebook, write your own personal post and promote it in the exact same way. Over the next 24 hours Facebook will let you know how it is going. It may not result in miracles, but I highly suspect you’ll conclude it was $7 well spent, and will find yourself plotting your next moves. We’ll talk about those moves later. Right now, get out there and do baby step 1.

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